Green Space

To contact the Director responsible for this initiative, email  greenspace@southrosedale.org

Branksome Hall Garbage Bin Change of Place

The applicant formally provided the rationale as to the reasons why they need the garbage bins facing the Park Road entrance. After reviewing the reasons, staff agreed to allow the bins to remain but only as a ‘temporary condition’ while the staging and construction process needed to occur with the new development at 6 Elm Ave.

However, following the completion of the construction process, the garbage bins will have to be relocated to a more appropriate location elsewhere on site. Staff determined that the compactor bins should be relocated to the existing asphalt parking lot area behind #3 Elm Ave on a permanent basis, which is a more appropriate place for this type of use. As well as, the bins will be properly screened in this location.

Once the bins have been removed from the Park Road area, the lands will be re-naturalized by the applicant, as per the City’s Ravine Planner and the TRCA Planner requirements. This area will have more trees planted than what was previously in place, in part due to a penalty determined for removing the trees in the first place, without the City’s permission.

A condition has been written into the Site Plan Agreement stipulating a specific expiry date of when the bins must be removed, regardless of whether the construction is complete or not. Below is the condition that the applicant is required to fulfill.

“The Owner shall relocate the recycling and garbage compactor bins from the Park Road entrance area to the parking lot behind the building and adjacent playground at 3 Elm Avenue, and where the Park Road grounds must be re-naturalized to the satisfaction of the Ravine and Natural Feature Protection Division prior to October 23, 2014, as detailed on the approved Drawings A001, A002 and T-PR.”

The Ravine Planner helped determine the date so that there’s still an opportunity to re-naturalize the area so that another season does pass without new plantings in place.

In addition, there’s a campus Site Plan drawing that illustrates the new location for the compactor bins behind #3 Elm Ave. and the Park Rd. area that illustrates a fully re-naturalized condition, that’s secured with the City.

With the secured site plan drawing and the condition contained in the site plan agreement identifying the future condition for the relocation of the garbage bins, the applicant is legally bound to fulfill that future condition.

We understand that this is not the desired interim condition for the Park Road residents however, staff had to take into consideration of the applicant’s request during the construction period activities and constraints as a result, but in the end, there should be an improved condition with more greening.

Diane Silver
Planner, City of Toronto
Wards 21, 22, 27

The garbage bins on Park road

However, following the completion of the construction process, the garbage bins will have to be relocated to a more appropriate location elsewhere on site. Staff determined that the compactor bins should be relocated to the existing asphalt parking lot area behind #3 Elm Ave on a permanent basis, which is a more appropriate place for this type of use. As well as, the bins will be properly screened in this location.

Once the bins have been removed from the Park Road area, the lands will be renaturalized by the applicant, as per the City’s Ravine Planner and the TRCA Planner requirements. This area will have more trees planted than what was previously in place, in part due to a penalty determined for removing the trees in the first place, without the City’s permission.

A condition has been written into the Site Plan Agreement stipulating a specific expiry date of when the bins must be removed, regardless of whether the construction is complete or not. Below is the condition that the applicant is required to fulfill.

“The Owner shall relocate the recycling and garbage compactor bins from the Park Road entrance area to the parking lot behind the building and adjacent playground at 3 Elm Avenue, and where the Park Road grounds must be re-naturalized to the satisfaction of the Ravine and Natural Feature Protection Division prior to October 23, 2014, as detailed on the approved Drawings A001, A002 and T-PR.”

The Ravine Planner helped determine the date so that there’s still an opportunity to re-naturalize the area so that another season does pass without new plantings in place.

In addition, there’s a campus Site Plan drawing that illustrates the new location for the compactor bins behind #3 Elm Ave. and the Park Rd. area that illustrates a fully re-naturalized condition, that’s secured with the City.

With the secured site plan drawing and the condition contained in the site plan agreement identifying the future condition for the relocation of the garbage bins, the applicant is legally bound to fulfill that future condition.

We understand that this is not the desired interim condition for the Park Road residents however, staff had to take into consideration of the applicant’s request during the construction period activities and constraints as a result, but in the end, there should be an improved condition with more greening.

Diane Silver
Planner, City of Toronto
Wards 21, 22, 27

The Gates to South Rosedale on Crescent Road

For one long-time resident of South Rosedale and Crescent Road, the “Gates to South Rosedale” project has become a reality. In 1993, retired businessman and philanthropist Raymond Cowling proposed to then Councillor John Adams, an idea of “Gates” or ornamental pillars on Crescent Road which would demarcate the entrance to South Rosedale on one of its main streets. The “Gates” would be located on either side of the boulevard on Crescent Road to the immediate east end of the bridge over the subway tracks at the Rosedale Subway Station. Not only was Mr. Cowling the initiator of the proposal, he also indicated his willingness at the time to personally underwrite the capital costs associated with their construction. As many issues like this go, City Staff at the time found a variety of reasons as to why the project could not, or should not proceed and the concept of pillars slipped into a bureaucratic slumber which would exist until this year.
In late 2011 Mr. Cowling approached the SRRA as to the renewed feasibility of the “Gates” and his continued interest in financially supporting the project if it could ever become a reality.
With the strong support of Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam, the SRRA has spent the better part of a year working closely with a variety of City Departments and their very cooperative Staff to make Mr. Cowling’s vision come true. As an indication of the overall complexity of the project, Toronto City Council approval was required last month for the road alterations and pillar construction to move forward.
In early November with weather permitting, a City contractor will commence the Crescent Road narrowing and associated boulevard and curb work to accommodate the pillars (also paid for by Mr. Cowling as part of the project’s cost). Immediately following that, a private contractor will begin construction of the decorative pillars which will be built of stone and will be approximately eight and one half (8.5) feet high and three (3) feet square on either side.

While this project will beautify one of the major street entrances of historically designated South Rosedale, it is also rare that one experiences the passion and generosity that a man such as Mr. Cowling has for his neighbourhood.

Download (PDF, 46KB)

Toronto Parks Plan Consultation

In 2010, City Council approved the development of a City-wide Parks Plan based on seven guiding principles: parks and trails as city infrastructure, equitable access for all residents, supporting a diversity of uses, nature in the city, environmental stewardship, place making and community engagement. The Parks Plan will guide acquisition, development, management and operation of the system of public parkland in the City of Toronto over a five-year period.
Toronto Parks, Forestry and Recreation invites your input to thestrategic plan. SRRA encourages you to participate by completing the online survey at link. The survey takes no more than 15 minutes to complete.
For general information on the Parks Plan and consultation, go to link

SRRA will also represent the neighbourhood at an upcoming public meeting.

Milkman’s Lane Restoration

The Milkman’s Lane reconstruction is now complete. Starting this winter, the City will undertake restoration work on the Craigleigh Gardens Ravine slope including invasive plant removal, slope rehabilitation and informal trail closures.
For more information please visit http://www.toronto.ca/parks/projects/milkman.htm.

Plant a Tree This Fall

Fall is a great time for planting trees. SRRA encourages you to plant a canopy tree in your front or back yard wherever there is open space. Trees add enormously to landscaping and property beautification, provide cooling shade in summer, and can add value to your home.
For private properties, the community organization LEAF (Local Enhancement & Appreciation of Forests) offers a subsidized tree planting program with low cost consultation and tree planting. Visit http://www.yourleaf.org/ for more information.
You may also have open space on the boulevard in front of your home, where a tree would look great, provide shade and even add to your privacy. If it’s on City-owned land near the roadway, you can get a tree planted FOR FREE. Visit http://www.toronto.ca/trees/tree_planting.htm for more information.

Evergreen Brick Works

To see the latest at Evergreen Brick Works, click on the following link to Evergreen’s Summer 2011 newsletter:http://www.evergreen.ca/newsletters/egnews/2011-08/

Dedication of Alex Murray Parkette

Dedication of Alex Murray Parkette

In recognition of Alex Murray’s forty year volunteer efforts for the SRRA, the City of Toronto has named a park at the corner of Crescent Road and South Drive in honour of his work. We present Alex’s remarks.

November 30, 2010

” I cannot deny that I am pleased to have my name attached to this little piece of South Rosedale.

I have worked long, hard and most of the time effectively to sustain and improve the very special environment that is South Rosedale.

A skeptic might assert that is was pretty easy to sustain those with special qualities. Rosedale is full of rich powerful people with connection in city Hall, the courts and on Bay Street. The can all get what they want.

To some degree that is true but continually there has to be a significant cluster of residents who have an enthusiasm for what South Rosedale is and a vision of what it could continue to be.

In 1962, when Laura, my wife, and moved to Toronto that vision of South Rosedale was not commonly agreed on.

Perched on the edge of downtown high rise developments, riddled with carved up mansions, rooming houses and sneaky ravine filling multi-story apartment buildings, South Rosedale through the lens of conventional economic models, was ripe for drastic redevelopment. For example, when a well meaning business school economist learned that we had bought a house in South Rosedale, he said: That is not a good buy. The market will rule and you will be surrounded by messy redevelopment.

But as an urban historian, I had studied examples in Europe, UK, and USA, where residents, particularly if they were wealthy, educated and connected, turned back the so called market forces through land use planning and zoning regulations to sustain, and enhance desirable neighbourhoods. I thought South Rosedale was such a place I had every reason to contribute to the process.

Over those forty years there has been a changing of issues but much continuity and repetition. The most singular theme that impresses and stays with me is the dedication and hard work of the SRRA Board and especially the Presidents.

It has been a most remarkable example of both stewardship and democracy.

Thank you.”